Pessimist trying to be optimist
There is too much of everything; I want it all.
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how to win a fight in anime

attack-on-ackerman:

1. fight rly hard

2. get the shit beat out of u and fall on the ground

3. get up slowly with blood dripping from ur mouth

4. crack a smile and say something about friends and not giving up

5. win. thats it u will automatically win after following steps 1-4

Tagged: (hp)

bellamyyoung:

We Potterheads aren’t kidding when we are saying she’s the queen

IT’S FUNNY BECAUSE IT’S REAL

(Source: ohcedric)

bellamyyoung:

We Potterheads aren’t kidding when we are saying she’s the queen

IT’S FUNNY BECAUSE IT’S REAL

(Source: ohcedric)

❝Never apologize for burning too brightly or collapsing into yourself every night. That is how galaxies are made.❞
— Tyler Kent White (via allwereallyneedisweed)
Tagged: (universe)

pyrrhiccomedy:

Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.

Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.

So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)

Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.

This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 

Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?

By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.

Sources: 1 2 3

(Source: wasbella102)

pyrrhiccomedy:


Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.
Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.
So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)
Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.
This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 
Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?
By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.
Sources: 1 2 3

pyrrhiccomedy:

Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.

Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.

So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)

Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.

This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 

Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?

By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.

Sources: 1 2 3

(Source: wasbella102)

(Source: me-kelleyoneill)

monobeartheater:

verylittlebird:

a magician asks you to pick a card - any card, in fact. you do. they ask you to put the card back in the pack - anywhere in the pack, in fact. you do. they walk away. ten years later, your wife gives birth to the six of clubs. “is this your card?” the midwife asks, in a familiar voice.

what the fuck

(Source: theriverjordyn)

golgibodies:

texting someone new is always weird.

like how do they feel about all lowercase letters? do they think it looks dumb? do i have to use super proper grammar and punctuation? will they know im being sarcastic when i start abbreviating words? are they a haha or lol person? are they a strict no acronyms kind of person? how do they feel about pet names? what’s their stance on emojis? 

it’s terrifying 

averagefairy:

why do they even include 2014 as an option when selecting your birth year online like u fresh out the womb ready to join gmail
Tagged: (studyspo)

breatheinandbreathout-andstudy:

AnnMarie Loves | Check out her lovely blog and free printable here.

breatheinandbreathout-andstudy:

AnnMarie Loves | Check out her lovely blog and free printable here.

breatheinandbreathout-andstudy:

AnnMarie Loves | Check out her lovely blog and free printable here.

Tagged: (studyspo)

Studying phonetics and watching Grey’s Anatomy. Tralala.

(Source: )


Studying phonetics and watching Grey’s Anatomy. Tralala.

Studying phonetics and watching Grey’s Anatomy. Tralala.

(Source: )

ouyangdan:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

gillpickle:

my babies are big, strong

THEIR FEATHERS STILL HAVE NOT COME IN YET BUT THAT IS OKAY

I STILL LOVE YOU

MY WEIRD FEATHERLESS CHICKEN BABIES

The wonders of adoption

seems legit

(Source: worldofthecutestcuties)

ouyangdan:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

gillpickle:

my babies are big, strong

THEIR FEATHERS STILL HAVE NOT COME IN YET BUT THAT IS OKAY
I STILL LOVE YOU
MY WEIRD FEATHERLESS CHICKEN BABIES

The wonders of adoption

seems legit

ouyangdan:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

gillpickle:

my babies are big, strong

THEIR FEATHERS STILL HAVE NOT COME IN YET BUT THAT IS OKAY

I STILL LOVE YOU

MY WEIRD FEATHERLESS CHICKEN BABIES

The wonders of adoption

seems legit

(Source: worldofthecutestcuties)

Tagged: (universe)

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng

(Source: universetoday.com)

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng

distant-traveller:

Milky Way rising above spectacular lightning display

The rise of the Milky Way and a spectacular lightning display in Mersing, Malaysia on June 28, 2014.

Image credit and copyright: Justin Ng

(Source: universetoday.com)

(Source: simply-divine-creation)

(Source: spockemon)